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Marketing Your Library Preview (video)

A preview clip of Library Video Network’s, Marketing Your Library. Full information on this DVD can be found on http://www.lvn.org.

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Effective Library Marketing (video)

Southeastern Louisiana State gets creative with “Learn to love books all over again” with a Valentine’s Day theme for eBooks.

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Research Rescue (video)

Another great library video — Research Rescue | Episode 1 “Stuck.” This is Episode 1 of 3:

In a world where research projects and papers lurk around every class syllabus there are those who have dedicated their lives to the organized pursuit of knowledge. Where there is a group project without direction, they’ll be there. Where there is a required number of credible sources needed, they’ll be there. Where there is a student who just doesn’t know where to start, they’ll be there. They are YOUR library’s Research Rescue Team and they’re always here to help! These are the “real” episodes of “real” librarians helping “real” students.

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Library Palooza: Innovative Library Marketing (video)

SUNY Albany shares tips on library marketing with their successful “library palooza” yearly event.

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The Research Games (video)

An example of a good marketing video: Texas A&M University Libraries and FutureLight Studios Present The Research Games — You either learn or you die. Yes, it’s a take on The Hunger Games.

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The New Library Patron (slideshare)

Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, discussed the Project’s new research about library patrons and non-patrons: who they are, what their information needs are, what kind of technology they use, and how libraries can meet the varying needs of their patrons.

View a video of Lee’s speech and review his slides:

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The Power of Library PR (slideshare)

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Marketing Libraries: What the not-for-profits can learn from the lots-of-profits (slideshare)

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ALSC accepting applications for 2014 Bookapalooza Program; due Feb. 1, 2014

The American Library Association (ALA) has announced that the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC) and the Grants Administration Committee are now accepting online applications for the 2014 Bookapalooza Program.

This program offers select libraries a collection of materials to be used in a way that creatively enhances their library service to children and families. The materials are primarily for children age birth through 14 and include newly published books, videos, audio books and recordings from children’s trade publishers.

Visit the ALA announcement page for details on the application requirements.

Submissions are due by February 1, 2014.

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Public Libraries as Providers of Digitally Inclusive Services and Resources: A National Survey Redefined

I just realized this started last week!

Starting this September, the American Library Association (ALA) Office for Research & Statistics and the University of Maryland Information Policy & Access Center will begin capturing information about the vital roles public libraries play in supporting digital inclusion.

The Digital Inclusion Survey will take the pulse of public library service in the areas of digital literacy, economic and workforce development, civic engagement, educational support, health information and public access to the internet.

“Documenting the impact of libraries in the Digital Age is more important than ever as government officials make difficult funding decisions with increasingly tightened public funds,” said ALA Executive Director Keith Michael Fiels. “I believe we all will be better equipped to make the case for libraries with data from this vital new study.”

Funded by a three-year, National Leadership Grant award from the Institute for Museum & Library Services (IMLS), the study builds on the long-running Public Library Funding & Technology Access Study, which provided a “state of the library” report on the technology resources brokered by libraries and the funding that enables free public access to these resources. The International City/County Management Association (ICMA) and the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) serve as partners on the grant.

“The results from the Digital Inclusion Survey are critical to understanding trends in both public access technology and the services provided by public libraries. Guessing at whether your library is keeping pace isn’t good enough – you need to know if you are,” said Denise Davis, deputy director, Sacramento Public Library. “And, you need to be able to tell the story of how the investment is making a difference in your community. This is the only national-level research that will help you paint that picture.

The survey will provide national and state estimates, but more importantly, will interactively show public libraries in context with community-level data (e.g., graduation and unemployment rates). Survey participants will be able to identify community impacts of library public computer and Internet access; identify gaps in technology services based on community needs and demographics; and demonstrate library contributions to community digital inclusion efforts.

Examples of how survey data can be used, as well as other information about the study, can be found at http://digitalinclusion.umd.edu/. The survey goes live Sept. 3, 2013.

I’ll be interested in seeing what the final results show.

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