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44% of adults have used a library website

Think that library websites have a small audience? Think again! Pew reports: “Library websites are catching on. 44% of those ages 16 and older have ever used a library website, up from 39% in 2012, and 30% used one in the past 12 months. Website users tend to be higher income and well educated.”

In addition, from the full report: “61% of those ages 16 and older have a library card.”

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Winners Announced in Texas Institute of Letters Competitions

From the Texas Institute of Letters:

Austin resident Tom Zigal took top prize Saturday evening in the Texas Institute of Letters’ literary competition for works published in 2013, claiming the $6,000 Jesse H. Jones Fiction award for his novel, Many Rivers To Cross, published by TCU Press, Institute President W.K. Stratton said.

[snip]

TIL member Rolando Hinojosa-Smith, a past recipient of the Lon Tinkle Award, was recognized for his recent honor of being named winner of the National Book Critic Circle’s Ivan Sandrof Lifetime Achievement Award. Austin authors Lawrence Wright and John Talia ferro split the nonfiction Carr P. Collins prize, Wright winning for his book Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief, published by Knopf, and Taliaferro winning for his book All the Great Prizes: The Life of John Hay from Lincoln to Roosevelt, published by Simon and Schuster.

Wright and Taliaferro split the prize of $5,000. Co-winners are rare in TIL competition. Author and journalist Jan Reid of Austin received the Lon Tinkle Award for a distinguished career in letters associated with Texas. Reid is the award-winning author of numerous books, both fiction and nonfiction, including the Jesse H. Jones Fiction award winner Comanche Sundown and the acclaimed biography of Ann Richards Let the People In. Reid is also known as
one of the first contributors to Texas Monthly, publishing his first article in the magazine the year it was founded. Early on in his writing career, Reid was a Dobie Paisano Fellow. The Dobie Paisano Fellowship program is  administered by the University of Texas and the Texas Institute of Letters.

[snip]

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NOTES:

 

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Kids and literacy are high priorities for library service

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Pew reports: “The public’s highest priorities for libraries center on kids and literacy. 85% of Americans say libraries “should definitely” coordinate more closely with local schools. And 82% believe libraries should provide free literacy programs to young children, which may include traditional reading, writing and comprehension as well as technology and new media literacies.”

From the full report: “Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project finds that many library patrons are eager to see libraries’ digital services expand, yet also feel that print books remain important in the digital age.”

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Books and media still the most important library service

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Pew reports: “Access to books, media, and quiet, safe reading places top the list of favorite library services. 80% of Americans say no-cost access to books and media is the most important service libraries provide, followed by librarian assistance (76%), having a quiet and safe place to read (75%) and research resources (72%).”

From the full report: “95% of Americans ages 16 and older agree that the materials and resources available at public libraries play an important role in giving everyone a chance to succeed.”

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Do we need more coffee shops in libraries?

eliasfalla / Pixabay

This article in Forbes makes the argument that libraries need to change their business models and would benefit from copying (and partnering with) Starbucks: “Why There Should Be A Starbucks In Every Local Library.” The writer asserts that one reason that Starbucks is a better model is not just the coffee, but the less restrictive environment.

Do you have a coffee shop or even vending machines in your library?

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Source: “Why There Should Be A Starbucks In Every Local Library

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Mothers love libraries

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Pew reports: “Mothers are more likely than fathers to read to their children every day (55% vs. 45%). Mothers are also more likely than fathers to have a library card and to have visited a library in the past year.”

From the full report: “The ties between parents and libraries start with the importance parents attach to the role of reading in their children’s lives. Half of parents of children under age 12 (50%) read to their child every day and an additional 26% do so a few times a week. Those with children under age 6 are especially keen on daily reading with their child: 58% of these parents read with their child every day and another 26% read multiple times a week with their children.”

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Texas Institute of Letters Finalists 2014

OpenClips / Pixabay

From the Texas Institute of Letters:

Finalists for the Texas Institute of Letters awards for 2014 have been announced by W.K. Stratton, President. The awards are for works appearing during calendar year 2013. The Institute was founded in 1936 to recognize literary achievement and to promote interest in Texas literature. Authors must have lived in Texas for at least two years or their works must relate to the state.

JESSE JONES AWARD FOR FICTION ($6,000)
Rick Bass, All the Land to Hold Us (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt); Philipp Meyer, The Son (Ecco Press); Tom Zigal, Many Rivers to Cross (TCU Press).

CARR P. COLLINS AWARD FOR NONFICTION ($5,000)
Jeff Guinn, Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson (Simon & Schuster); Nick Kotz, The Harness Maker’s Dream: Nathan Kallison and the Rise of South Texas (TCU Press);  John Taliaferro, All the Great Prizes: The Life of John Hay, from Lincoln to Roosevelt (Simon & Schuster); Lawrence Wright, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief (Knopf).

STEVEN TURNER AWARD FOR FIRST FICTION ($1,000)
Nan Cuba, Body and Bread (Engine Books); Kelly Luce, Three Scenarios in Which Hana Sasaki Grows a Tail (A Strange Object); Mario Alberto Zambrano, Lotería (Harper).

RAMIREZ AWARD FOR SCHOLARLY BOOK ($2,500)
Raul Coronado, A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture (Harvard University Press).

HELEN C.SMITH MEMORIAL AWARD FOR POETRY ($1,200)
Bruce Bond, Choir of the Wells (Etruscan Press); Lance Larsen, Genius Loci (University of Tampa Press); Pattiann Rogers, Holy Heathen Rhapsody (Viking).

BOB BUSH MEMORIAL AWARD FOR FIRST BOOK OF POETRY ($1,000)
Frances Hatfield, Rudiments of Flight (Wings Press); Stacy R. Nigliazzo, Scissored Moon (Press 53); Sasha West, Failure and I Bury the Body (Harper Perennial).

H-E-B/JEAN FLYNN CHILDREN’S BOOK AWARD ($500)
Sherry Garland, illustrated by Layne Johnson,Voices of Pearl Harbor (Pelican Publishing); Xavier Garza, Maximilian and the Mystery of the Bingo Rematch (Cinco Puntos Press); Patricia Vermillion and Kuleigh Smith,Texas Chili? Oh My!(TCU Press).

H-E-B AWARD, YOUNG ADULTS BOOK ($500)
Kathi Appelt,The True Blue Scouts of Sugar Man Swamp (Atheneum Books)

EDWIN “BUD” SHRAKE AWARD FOR SHORT NONFICTION ($1,000)
John MacCormack, “Life on the Shale,” San Antonio Express-News; Jessica Wilbanks, “On the Far Side of the Fire,” Ninth Letter

KAY CATTARULLA AWARD FOR SHORT STORY ($1,000)
Bret Anthony Johnston, “To a Good Home,” Virginia Quarterly Review; Edward McPherson, “Reunion 1938”Epoch, Paul Christensen, “My Beautiful Life,” Agni.

FRED WHITEHEAD AWARD FOR DESIGN OF A TRADE BOOK ($750)
Bill Brammer for Hometown, Texas, by Karla K. Morton (TCU Press); Ann Giangiulio for Remember Dippy By Shirley Reva Vernick (Cinco Puntos Press); Lindsay Starr for Two Prospectors: The Letters of Sam Shepard and Johnny Dark, edited by Chad Hammett (University of Texas Press).

SOEURETTE DIEHL FRASER AWARD FOR BEST TRANSLATION OF A BOOK ($1,000)
David Bowles, Flower, Song, Dance: Aztec and Mayan Poetry (Lamar University Press); Johnny Byrd, Luis Humberto Crosthwaite’s Out of Their Minds (Cinco Puntos).

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Americans appreciate libraries

WokinghamLibraries / Pixabay

Pew reports: “Americans appreciate libraries, especially for the role they play in communities. 90% of Americans say the closing of their local public library would impact their community and 67% said it would affect them and their families.”

From the full report: “the vast majority of Americans ages 16 and older say that public libraries play an important role in their communities.”

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50% of adults own a tablet computer or ereader

Pew reports: “The rise of e-book reading is tied to the steady increase in ownership of tablet computers and e-readers. 50% of adults now own either a tablet computer or an e- reader. Ownership of both devices jumped this year during the holiday gift-giving season. But people also read e-books on their cell phones (32% of e-book readers did that in the past 12 months) and on desktop or laptop computers (29% of e-book readers did that in the past 12 months).”

From the full report: “Three in ten adults read an e-book last year; half own a tablet or e-reader.”

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69% read printed books

Pew reports: “E-book reading is growing, but printed books still dominate the reading world. 28% of American adults ages 18 and older read an e-book in the past year, up from 17% in 2011. Still, 69% read a printed book, about the same as last year. Only 4% of readers are “e-book only” readers. The vast majority of e-book readers also read a printed book.”

However, it’s important to note that “print remains the foundation of Americans’ reading habits.”

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