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Happy New Year!

It’s no secret that we haven’t posted anything new … in a while. We’re on hiatus. We’re on a break. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter and check out our other sites (through the links in the sidebar). And have a happy 2017!

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IMLS Announces 276 Grants, $14.16 Million for Libraries in the United States

Via Library Journal:

From the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS): The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) today announced 276 grants to institutions totaling $14,165,292.

More info:

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Source: IMLS Announces 276 Grants, $14.16 Million for Libraries in the United States | LJ INFOdocket

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Why are library blogs a good idea?

geralt / PixabayI frequently recommend blogs to people running non-profits, especially libraries. This post from Ned Potter talks about why this is a good idea:

  • Blogging platforms come mobile-ready — this is mostly true, but only if you pick the right theme and don’t add plug-ins or a lot of extras that aren’t mobile-friendly
  • Google loves blogs — blog posts gets indexed by search engines fast
  • Blogs are easy to use — there is a small learning curve, but they’re mostly easy to use
  • Blogs are free — which is technically correct, but not really

Blogs are an easy way to build a website, or to add to an existing website. And they are relatively inexpensive.

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SOURCE: Why have an institutional blog? — Ned Potter

IMAGE SOURCE: geralt / Pixabay

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The Most Powerful Authors in Hollywood

jarmoluk / Pixabay

Have you ever wondered who the biggest authors in Hollywood are? According to Hollywood Reporter, these authors are the most influential… because they’ve brought in money and created great content.

#1 J.K. Rowling
#2 Stephen King
#3 George R.R. Martin#4 EL James (this one surprised me)

Check out the article for the complete list.

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SOURCE: Hollywood’s 25 Most Powerful Authors – The Hollywood Reporter

IMAGE SOURCE: jarmoluk / Pixabay

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How to Write a Book Review

5MinutesforBooks.com has a good post with tips on writing a good book review post: “The Do’s and Don’ts of Writing a Book Review, by author of How to Write Anything.” It’s worth taking a look at it and bookmarking it for future use.

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Image source: PublicDomainPictures / Pixabay

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How and why librarians weed stacks

Recommended reading:

Secrets of the Stacks

How libraries decide which books to keep—and which don’t stand the test of time

via Medium

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NOTES:

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A new way of looking at public library engagement in America

WokinghamLibraries / PixabayFrom Pew Internet Research:

A new way of looking at public library engagement in America

We recently released our latest report, a typology of public library engagement in America. Using the data behind our previous report on how people value libraries in their communities, this typology divides Americans into nine groups that reflect different patterns of public library engagement along a general spectrum of high, medium, low, and non-engagement.

[snip]

Image source: WokinghamLibraries / Pixabay

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UH Downtown receives $15,000 NEA grant

2014.05 A_Lesson_Before_Dying_novelThe Houston Chronicle is reporting that the University of Houston-Downtown is receiving a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to host The Big Read. They will receive $15,000. Their book is “A Lesson Before Dying” by Ernest J. Gaines.

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SOURCE: University of Houston Downtown receives $15,000 NEA grant || Houston Chronicle

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30% don’t know what you offer

If I ask anyone who markets or communicates for a library: “What’s your biggest challenge?” There’s a good chance the answer is going to be “Getting information out to our audiences.” Pew reports: “One challenge libraries face is simply making people aware of all the services they offer. 30% of library users say they know little or nothing about the services their library provides.”

In addition, from the full report: “91% of Americans say they have had some exposure to libraries in the past.”

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44% of adults have used a library website

Think that library websites have a small audience? Think again! Pew reports: “Library websites are catching on. 44% of those ages 16 and older have ever used a library website, up from 39% in 2012, and 30% used one in the past 12 months. Website users tend to be higher income and well educated.”

In addition, from the full report: “61% of those ages 16 and older have a library card.”

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